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Computing

At Shaw-cum-Donnington we aim to provide a high-quality computing education which equips children with skills that are essential in the 21st Century.  Throughout the curriculum our eyes are on the future; many of the contexts that frame the children’s studies are professions that use computing all the time.  Our children are the future engineers, designers, film directors and musicians, so we want to foster their aspirations as well as teach them the knowledge and understanding that the 21st century economy requires.  They will also learn the collaborative skills that underpin so many aspects of our digital lives, be it for the purpose of enjoyment, future education or professional necessity.

Intent

Through discrete computing lessons and with using technology throughout all areas of the curriculum, children will understand the key principles of computing.  The curriculum is taught in specific blocks which ensures children are able to develop depth in their knowledge and skills over the duration of each of their computing topics. We have a set of netbooks, a set of iPads, and a range of devices such as beebots and other programmable toys to ensure that all children have the opportunity to become confident using a range of technology and for many purposes across the curriculum.  The implementation of the curriculum also ensures a balanced coverage of computer science, information technology and digital literacy.  The children will have experiences of all three strands in each year group, but the subject knowledge imparted becomes increasingly specific and in depth, with more complex skills being taught, thus ensuring that learning is built upon.  For example, children in Key Stage 1 learn what algorithms are, which leads them to the design stage of programming in Key Stage 2, where they design, write and debug programs, explaining the thinking behind their algorithms.  E Safety is fundamental and is therefore taught at a distinct unit every year along with at the beginning of every half term.

Implementation

Through discrete computing lessons and with using technology throughout all areas of the curriculum, children will understand the key principles of computing.  The curriculum is taught in specific blocks which ensures children are able to develop depth in their knowledge and skills over the duration of each of their computing topics. We have a set of netbooks, a set of iPads, and a range of devices such as beebots and other programmable toys to ensure that all children have the opportunity to become confident using a range of technology and for many purposes across the curriculum.  The implementation of the curriculum also ensures a balanced coverage of computer science, information technology and digital literacy.  The children will have experiences of all three strands in each year group, but the subject knowledge imparted becomes increasingly specific and in depth, with more complex skills being taught, thus ensuring that learning is built upon.  For example, children in Key Stage 1 learn what algorithms are, which leads them to the design stage of programming in Key Stage 2, where they design, write and debug programs, explaining the thinking behind their algorithms.  E Safety is fundamental and is therefore taught at a distinct unit every year along with at the beginning of every half term.

Impact

The impact of our computing curriculum can not only be seen in children’s individual computer accounts, but also can be measured by speaking to the children themselves. The teaching of the computing curriculum enables our children to use a computer and other devices with confidence.

We measure the impact of our curriculum using the following methods:

  • Summative assessment of pupil discussions about their learning.
  • Images of the children’s practical learning in a class portfolio.
  • Children’s work saved onto their individual accounts
  • Interviewing the pupils about their learning (pupil voice).
  • Class portfolios are scrutinised and there is the opportunity for a dialogue between teachers to understand their class’s work.

Children in Foundation Stage are assessed within Understand the World and their progress is tracked. 

See Computing & eSafety Polciy

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